Nathalie Du Pasquier
America 1

 America 1, 150 knots per inch, New Zealand wool, 95 x 59 inches Edition of 20 + 2 APs

America 1, 150 knots per inch, New Zealand wool, 95 x 59 inches Edition of 20 + 2 APs

Nathalie Du Pasquier is a French painter and designer, who lives in Milan and is one of the founding members of the legendary Memphis Design Group. Working within various practices, Du Pasquier is intrigued by the relationship between physical form and its surface and while known for her ostensibly abstract paintings and motifs, it is really only reality that interests her.  Du Pasquier’s ongoing investigation into form and function is manifested in paintings, sculptures, designs, patterns, constructions, carpets, books, and ceramics—constantly acting between the representational and non-representational, the tangible and intangible, reality and imagination, and two- and three-dimensional forms.  There is no faked solemnity in her work; she fearlessly utilizes saturated pop-groove color and classically mesmerizing avant-baroque patterns to achieve something that is both dead-serious and whimsical.  Her work seeks to solve the form//ornament dilemma  posed by Adolf Loos.

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 Du Pasquier at her studio in Milan, Italy. Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani for Surface Magazine

Du Pasquier at her studio in Milan, Italy. Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani for Surface Magazine

BravinLee editions is a proud member of GoodWeave

GoodWeave’s founder Kailash Satyarthi was recently awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in honor of his career dedicated to ending the exploitation of children around the world. GoodWeave, an international nonprofit organization geared toward abolishing child labor in the carpet industry, has liberated and educated thousands of children, bringing them from carpet looms to classrooms.  Satyarthi and GoodWeave work to guide consumers to its Child Labor Free Certified rugs and replicate their market-based approach of certification in other sectors.  Kailash said at the ceremony, “I refuse to accept that the shackles of slavery can ever be stronger than the quest for freedom.” He asked those in attendance to place their hands over their hearts and “listen to the child inside.”